Discovery Advocate

Discovery Advocate

News, Developments and Practical Advice on eDiscovery in the trenches of Litigation

Retooling Your Practice Under the New Rules with The Sedona Conference Institute: a Case Summary (Part 2)

Posted in E-Discovery Rules, The Sedona Conference

TSC logoBy Karin Jenson, national leader, E-Discovery Advocacy and Management Team and Co-Chair of The 2016 Sedona Conference Institute And Jacqueline K. Matthews, BakerHostetler associate

Every year, The Sedona Conference Institute keeps us ahead of the e-discovery curve with panels such as the famous Case Law Update and Judicial Roundtable.  This year’s Institute will be devoted to the changes in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and will include panels on the new Rules 26, 34 and 37(e). The new Rules are already generating significant case law, and there will be even more by the time we meet in San Diego on March 17-18.  In the coming weeks, we will be posting brief summaries of some of these recent cases. For a more in-depth look at the new rules and how to retool your practice, register for The Sedona Conference Institute. Meanwhile, here’s a summary of Brown v. Dobler, No. 1:15-cv-00132, 2015 WL 9581414 (D. Idaho Dec. 29, 2015):

A district court in Idaho recently considered a pro se inmate’s motion to compel the production of documents by various defendants in Idaho’s corrections system. While pro se litigants inexperienced in litigation often run afoul of the Rules, this time the court found it was the represented defendants who had failed comply with their discovery obligations.

The court first established that, although the motion to compel had been filed prior the December 1, 2015 effective date of amended Federal Rules, it was the newly amended Rule 34 that governed the motion. The defendants had violated new Rule 34(b) by making boilerplate privilege and confidentiality objections without stating whether responsive materials were being withheld on the basis of those objections.

Further, although some of the plaintiff’s document requests were overly broad, the court specifically instructed the defendants to “use their judgment” to “respond to an overly broad request with information or documents that are relevant to Plaintiff’s claims.” The takeaway for responding parties is that, if any subset of documents responsive to a particular request is not subject to objection, a responding party should consider whether to produce the unobjectionable documents while working to narrow the request with the adversary.

 

Retooling Your Practice Under the New Rules with The Sedona Conference Institute: a Case Summary (Part 1)

Posted in The Sedona Conference

TSC logoBy Karin Jenson, national leader, E-Discovery Advocacy and Management Team and Co-Chair of The 2016 Sedona Conference Institute And Jacqueline K. Matthews, BakerHostetler associate

Every year, The Sedona Conference Institute keeps us ahead of the e-discovery curve with panels such as the famous Case Law Update and Judicial Roundtable.  This year’s Institute will be devoted to the changes in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and will include panels on the new Rules 26, 34 and 37(e). The new Rules are already generating significant case law, and there will be even more by the time we meet in San Diego on March 17-18.  In the coming weeks, we will be posting brief summaries of some of these recent cases. For a more in-depth look at the new rules and how to retool your practice, register for The Sedona Conference Institute.  Meanwhile, here’s a summary of CAT3, LLC v. Black Lineage, Inc., No. 14CIV5511ATJCF, 2016 WL 154116 (S.D.N.Y. Jan. 12, 2016):

A main goal of the newly revised Federal Rule 37(e) is to provide a uniform standard for the imposition of sanctions when electronically stored information is lost because a party failed to take reasonable steps to ensure preservation.  While the Advisory Committee Notes state that the new Fed. R. Civ. P. 37(e) “forecloses reliance on inherent authority or state law to determine when certain measures should be used,” the Southern District of New York recently stated in dicta that even where the requirements of Rule 37(e) were not met, the court could nevertheless use its inherent authority to impose sanctions for the bad faith spoliation of evidence.

The facts of Cat3, involving intentional alteration of domain names of senders and recipients of key emails,  were sufficient for the court to conclude that sanctions were warranted both under Rule 37(e)(1) and 37(e)(2). But it remains to be seen whether, when confronted with a case that does not fit neatly into the Rule 37 framework, courts will invoke inherent authority.

Congratulations! Now what?

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules

Litigation_shutterstock_126537545Twitter is abuzz with messages about today’s effective date for the changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure that read more like birth announcements (“It’s finally here!”). But figuring out what to do once you get that baby home is another matter – despite having a long time to prepare. Moreover, while there is as much commentary about the rules changes as there are parenting books, it’s hard to really figure out what to do until you are doing it.

Having stared down our first Request for Production of Documents due after today, we offer the following tips for adjusting to the new rules, with the caveat that they may not apply in every case. If you have your own tips, post them in the comments or email us.

Timing

  • The changes affect pending cases “so long as just and practicable.” The judges involved in the changes have voiced an expectation that they be applied in pending cases.
  • Your best bet for complying with the amended rules is early case assessment. As soon as possible, figure out:
    • Who the key custodians are, and what their roles are.
    • Where the main documents reside.
    • What the challenging places are where discoverable information might reside, such as structured databases, applications, and proprietary platforms.
    • Whether there are sources of potentially relevant electronically stored information that are likely to be lost (e.g., automatic deletion of email) if steps are not taken to preserve them.
    • What factual issues are undisputed and not necessary for discovery.
    • What you need from the adversary in order to resolve the issues in dispute.
  • The deadline for service of a complaint has been shortened by 30 days, to 90 days after filing.
  • The deadline for using a scheduling order has been shortened by 30 days.

Continue Reading

Conclusion: Your First Five Questions (times four): A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – Are you Ready?

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five QuestionsThe current amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—and, in particular, those that address the practice of civil discovery—are the product of five years of development, debate, and, of course, dialogue. Now that the Rules are set to be implemented on December 1, 2015 – and they apply to pending cases where “just and practicable” — the focus among attorneys and their clients has changed from what the Rules should say to how they should work. While debates remain as to how certain parts of the Rules will wear-and-tear once put to the test in discovery, there are clear indications within the text of the Rules (with some help from the Committee Notes to the Rules and the contributions of judges and other writers) as to how the Rules will apply. Over the past few weeks as part of Discovery Advocate’s First Five Questions series, we have examined some of the initial and immediate considerations expressed within and surrounding the rules and applies them to practice, regarding the Rules’ application to Proportionality (Rule 26); Early Case Assessment (Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34); Preservation (Rule 37); and Objections (Rule 34). A version of these posts were published as “Twenty Questions: A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” for the 2015 Georgetown Advanced E-Discovery Institute.

Conclusion:

While this series’ 20 questions have not asked “animal, vegetable, or mineral,” and will not offer a lifetime supply of Pageant magazine, Ronson Lighters, or Wildroot Cream-oil,[1] readers have received something even better: practical advice that can be used in office or in court, to help friend and foe alike survive and even thrive in today’s discovery practice. Really, there is only one final question:

Are you ready?

[1] Wikipedia, Twenty Questions – Television (Sept. 28, 2015) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty_Questions.

Day 4: Your First Five Questions (times four): A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – Rule 34 Objections

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five QuestionsThe current amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—and, in particular, those that address the practice of civil discovery—are the product of five years of development, debate, and, of course, dialogue. Now that the Rules are set to be implemented on December 1, 2015 – and they apply to pending cases where “just and practicable” — the focus among attorneys and their clients has changed from what the Rules should say to how they should work. While debates remain as to how certain parts of the Rules will wear-and-tear once put to the test in discovery, there are clear indications within the text of the Rules (with some help from the Committee Notes to the Rules and the contributions of judges and other writers) as to how the Rules will apply. Over the next few weeks as part of Discovery Advocate’s First Five Questions series, we will examine some of the initial and immediate considerations expressed within and surrounding the rules and applies them to practice, regarding the Rules’ application to Proportionality (Rule 26); Early Case Assessment (Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34); Preservation (Rule 37); and Objections (Rule 34). A version of these posts were published as “Twenty Questions: A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” for the 2015 Georgetown Advanced E-Discovery Institute.

Rule 34 Objections

Like the other amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the amendments to Rule 34 seek to expedite the discovery process and encourage parties to communicate earlier about the availability of requested documents and any difficulties or restrictions on their production. In particular, pursuant to the amendments, objections to Rule 34 requests for production must be specific.[1] For example, if a request is overly broad because it calls for all documents relating to a particular subject, such as financial records, counsel should be prepared to discuss the various financial records and which ones should be produced in the matter. Given this, counsel should ask themselves the following questions when responding and objecting to a Rule 34 request. Continue Reading

Day 3: Your First Five Questions (times four): A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – Preservation

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules, Preservation, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five QuestionsThe current amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—and, in particular, those that address the practice of civil discovery—are the product of five years of development, debate, and, of course, dialogue. Now that the Rules are set to be implemented on December 1, 2015 – and they apply to pending cases where “just and practicable” — the focus among attorneys and their clients has changed from what the Rules should say to how they should work. While debates remain as to how certain parts of the Rules will wear-and-tear once put to the test in discovery, there are clear indications within the text of the Rules (with some help from the Committee Notes to the Rules and the contributions of judges and other writers) as to how the Rules will apply. Over the next few weeks as part of Discovery Advocate’s First Five Questions series, we will examine some of the initial and immediate considerations expressed within and surrounding the rules and applies them to practice, regarding the Rules’ application to Proportionality (Rule 26); Early Case Assessment (Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34); Preservation (Rule 37); and Objections (Rule 34). A version of these posts were published as “Twenty Questions: A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” for the 2015 Georgetown Advanced E-Discovery Institute.

Today we review: Preservation

Preservation is being added to both Rule 16 and 26 as a topic for meet and confers and scheduling orders. But with respect to the duty to preserve, it is the “new and (hopefully) improved” Rule 37(e) that holds a special place in the hearts of those practitioners who have been following its progression. Rule 37(e) as it existed from 2006 through 2015 provided for a limited safe harbor associated with the systematic loss of ESI[1] instead of imposing sanctions. However, determining what behaviors removed parties from that safe harbor became a court-by-court analysis that ran the gamut from negligence to recklessness to outright willfulness. The modified (and streamlined) Rule 37(e) has attempted to simplify that inquiry and is intended to require that, before a court determines sanctions, it is not considering the range of behavior described above. Instead, the court will examine simply whether the “loss involves ESI that ‘should have been preserved’ because the party failed to take ‘reasonable steps’ to prevent the loss of relevant ESI once the duty to preserve [is] triggered.”[2] Subsequently, if the court finds that a party failed to take reasonable steps and there is no alternative replacement evidence, then—and only then—will the court examine whether curative or other sanctions will be awarded under 37(e).[3] This underscores the importance of the required reasonable steps, as well as what it means for organizations to preserve and/or search for alternative evidence in the face of accidental deletion of ESI and other evidence. Both are examined more fully below. Continue Reading

Day 2: Your First Five Questions (times four): A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – Early Case Assessment

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five QuestionsThe current amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—and, in particular, those that address the practice of civil discovery—are the product of five years of development, debate, and, of course, dialogue. Now that the Rules are set to be implemented on December 1, 2015 – and they apply to pending cases where “just and practicable” — the focus among attorneys and their clients has changed from what the Rules should say to how they should work. While debates remain as to how certain parts of the Rules will wear-and-tear once put to the test in discovery, there are clear indications within the text of the Rules (with some help from the Committee Notes to the Rules and the contributions of judges and other writers) as to how the Rules will apply. Over the next few weeks as part of Discovery Advocate’s First Five Questions series, we will examine some of the initial and immediate considerations expressed within and surrounding the rules and applies them to practice, regarding the Rules’ application to Proportionality (Rule 26); Early Case Assessment (Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34); Preservation (Rule 37); and Objections (Rule 34). A version of these posts were published as “Twenty Questions: A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” for the 2015 Georgetown Advanced E-Discovery Institute.

Today we review: Early Case Assessment

Changes to Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are meant to speed up case proceedings and to require counsel to quickly assess the case and what discovery is necessary. Although strategy and views on discovery will certainly change as the case proceeds, the amended rules require a solid assessment of case strategy and discovery issues—particularly electronic discovery—earlier than practitioners may normally be accustomed to. Practitioners who like to take their time should take special note: discovery is moving faster, and attorneys need to keep up. Continue Reading

Day 1: Your First Five Questions (times four): A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – Proportionality

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five QuestionsThe current amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—and, in particular, those that address the practice of civil discovery—are the product of five years of development, debate, and, of course, dialogue. Now that the Rules are set to be implemented on December 1, 2015 – and they apply to pending cases where “just and practicable” — the focus among attorneys and their clients has changed from what the Rules should say to how they should work. While debates remain as to how certain parts of the Rules will wear-and-tear once put to the test in discovery, there are clear indications within the text of the Rules (with some help from the Committee Notes to the Rules and the contributions of judges and other writers) as to how the Rules will apply. Over the next few weeks as part of Discovery Advocate’s First Five Questions series, we will examine some of the initial and immediate considerations expressed within and surrounding the rules and applies them to practice, regarding the Rules’ application to Proportionality (Rule 26); Early Case Assessment (Rules 4, 16, 26, and 34); Preservation (Rule 37); and Objections (Rule 34). A version of these posts were published as “Twenty Questions: A Practical Guide to the Amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” for the 2015 Georgetown Advanced E-Discovery Institute.

Today we start with Proportionality.

One of the purposes of the new amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure is to again address the problem of over-discovery. The 1983 and 1993 amendments to the Rules attempted to address this problem through an emphasis on proportionality, but found that a practical application was not always forthcoming when even “courts have not always insisted on proportionality when it was warranted.”[1] In particular, the amendments to Rule 26 serve to re-focus the scope of discovery on proportionality—and allowing parties to obtain the documents they truly need to prosecute or defend their case while simultaneously alleviating any unnecessary burdens on the opposing party. Proportionality is one of the central themes to the amendments, and several important questions relating to the effect of the amendments on this topic are addressed below. Continue Reading

December 2015 Changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: A BakerHostetler Q&A

Posted in E-Discovery Advocacy and Management, E-Discovery Rules

In this video, E-Discovery Advocacy and Management team leader Karin S. Jenson answers questions raised by clients and colleagues about the December 1 expected changes to the discovery rules of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, their potential practical impact, and how to prepare, including:

  • What are the rules changes, and when do they take effect?
  • How will these rules changes impact discovery?
  • What can clients do to prepare for the changes?

Continue Reading

Developing or Enhancing “Bring Your Own Device” Programs – Your First Five Questions . . .

Posted in Employment, Information Governance, Privacy, Your First Five Questions

magnifyingglass_000001973994_First Five Questions

This is the second blog post in Discovery Advocate’s new series, “Your First Five Questions,” in which we identify a question commonly (or sometimes not so commonly) seen in practice followed by the first five questions you might ask and why. Have a scenario you’d like us to address? Contact us.

Your client, a multinational whose business involves regular cross-border data transfers, solicits your help with the development and implementation of an effective and compliant “bring your own device” (BYOD) program to address employee use of personal mobile devices for work purposes. What are your first five questions? Continue Reading